Commercial: 201 Bishopsgate development

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Commercial Stylish design for structures Aesthetically and structurally, the design of the 35 storey Broadgate Tower and the adjacent 12 storey 201 Bishopsgate building are very much Skidmore Owings & Merrill (SOM) productions, similar in nature to high rise SOM buildings in Boston and Chicago. Each of the London buildings is steel framed and clad in stainless steel and glass, with the SOM signature of exposed structural members and angles contributing to a ‘sharp’ visual effect. The Broadgate Tower is a parallelogram in plan, whereas 201 Bishopsgate features concave and convex elevations, as well as one straight side adjacent to the tower. Both buildings gain their stiffness from a combination of steel bracing and lift shafts, although the massive steel cross members contribute the majority of the tower’s robustness, the lift core steelwork being suspended from the main frame. London rise office development containsThe City of London’s next high gets and 201 Bishopsgate buildingsBritish Land’s Broadgate Tower signature logistical challenges for William– iconic steel structures and towers Jon Masters reports.Hare and Bovis Lend Lease. Economic conditions have become good again for big speculative developments in London and along Bishopsgate, close to the capital’s financial heart, the latest high rise structure is progressing on schedule. Steelwork contractor William Hare is now nearing the end of its part in the Broadgate Tower and 201 Bishopsgate development – an impressive steel construction project in many ways. Some heavy structural engineering has been employed at the base of both buildings to allow them to be built over mainline rail tracks just north of Liverpool Street Station and equally impressive work has followed as the steel frames have risen. Both buildings are now nearing full height – 35 storeys in the Broadgate Tower and 12 in the adjacent 201 Bishopsgate. When Hare’s work is completed a total of 13,000t of steelwork will have been fabricated at the company’s Yorkshire yards, transported to central London and erected within a site no bigger than the buildings’ footprints. At peak production late last year, Hare’s site team At peak production, 120t of steelwork everywas taking delivery of Hare’s site team day, unloading it along Primrose Street to the were taking south for Broadgate delivery of 120t of Tower and in the ‘pit-lane’ established steelwork every day. within the columns of 201 Bishopsgate for receiving materials for that building. “It feels not long ago since we were planning the delivery programme and doing trial runs to check the logistics would work with the size of the lorry loads,” says Hare’s London Director Nick Day. 20 NSC February 2007


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