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NEWS Construction News New guide on intumescent coatings AROUND THE PRESS 17 March 2005 The sixth and final section of Hea- Design and contractual guidance is accurately reflect current standards, updated to reflect the experience of throw Terminal 5’s 17,000-tonne being provided by an updated model procedures and expectations of the past nine years. The sections on steel roof, fabricated by Watson specification for off site applied the structural steelwork industry. fire protection of beams with web Steel, was slotted into place by intumescent coatings, which will John Dowling, Chairman of the P160 openings, concrete filled hollow Italian lifting specialist Fagioli ear- be launched this month by the Steel Development Committee, said: “The sections, connections, composite lier this month. The placement is a Construction Institute. The new first edition provided a new industry beams and bracing, reflect the latest milestone in BAA’s £4.2bn Heath- guide — Structural Fire Design: Off- standard for the use of off-site thinking. Information has now been row project, which has now site Applied Thin Film Intumescent applied intumescent coatings, and included on the protection of partially reached the half-way stage. Coatings — is a new edition of SCI by presenting a model specification exposed members. Building Canary Wharf (supple- P160 which was introduced in 1996 it was hoped that greater uniformity The second part of the new ment to Building) and which is thought to have been could be achieved in contract guide provides Model Specification 18 March 2005 overtaken by the rapid success of specifications. Clauses for use in the preparation of “With structural steelwork, con- off-site applied intumescent coatings “We said at the time that we contract documentation relating to crete and cladding, we together since then. would update the guidance in line off-site applied thin film coatings. The with our suppliers and contrac- The off-site intumescent coating with industry experiences and this standard clauses can be modified tors have achieved rates of erec- application industry is expected revision relies heavily on the input of or omitted as required by the user tion not usually seen in the UK.” to fire-protect over 70,000 tonnes people from across the sector.” but most should be capable of use Canary Wharf Contractors Execu- of structural steelwork this year, The guide is in two parts. The first without the need for modification. tive Director Dan Frank. a success story which has taken part, Design Guidance, concerns The guide will be available to The Structural Engineer many by surprise. The new guidance handling, storing and transporting download as a Word document from 15 March 2005 has been designed to more coated steelwork and has been fully www.steelbiz.org from 21 April 2005. ‘Steel construction is doing well... and we are in an environment Welding was not allowed in the where our prices are now ex- gallery, so the 35 pieces had to be pected to be much more stable,’ bolted together. Because the sculp- announced BCSA President Tom tor wanted clean joints rather than visible bolts, the joints are made with Goldberg at the BCSA’s National 1500 countersunk bolts in drilled and Dinner. Mr Goldberg said price tapped holes rather than the usual levels were sufficient to maintain clearance holes. The components healthy investment in machinery, were sent to a machining shop to be material handling equipment, drilled and tapped to the required ac- computerised systems for design/ curacy. control/operations, and training The floor is too weak to carry the and maintenance of an ever- sculpture directly, so it rests on a more-competent workforce, and transfer structure designed by struc- in research and development of tural engineer Campbell Reith Hill innovative products and methods. to direct its weight into load-bear- Building ing walls beneath. In addition some 4 March 2005 props have been used, making it nec- ‘John Prescott set you a challenge essary to close of part of the gallery’s four years ago. Today I set you an basement café for the duration of the even greater one — it is to elimi- exhibition. nate all deaths. Why? Because I There were no engineering draw- believe every death in construc- ings: William Hare worked from a set tion is avoidable.” — Construc- of drawings used to produce a plastic tion Minister Nigel Griffiths at the scale model provided by the sculp- 2005 Health and Safety Summit. tor from which it produced a walk- Building through X-Steel model for approval. 4 March 2005 Due to height restrictions in the “The UK industry went through a bit of a hiatus between the loss of Tate’s 100 tonne steps stability of the sculpture, purpose-gallery and to ensure temporary traditional craftsmanship and the made equipment was designed. This advent of computer technology. included a gantry crane running on Now I think it is fantastic. Con- Constructing a 100-tonne steel struc- covering 50 years of the sculptor’s rails with movement of the frame be- tractors that are using computers ture to form the centrepiece of a new work. ing achieved by Tirfor winches, and are doing incredibly good work. exhibition by Sir Anthony Caro at the “One of the main problems was a temporary support frame that al- Thomas Vale, which worked with Tate Modern presented several unu- how to get it into the gallery,” said lowed fine adjustments in level and us on the Spiral Café at Birming- sual challenges for steelwork con- Richard Branford, William Hare plumb. ham, was great.” — David Marks tractor William Hare. Project Manager. “We had to size The programme for erection was of Marks Barfield, designers of ‘Millbank Steps’, built from 40mm the components to go through doors three weeks. “We beat the pro- the London Eye. thick weathering steel plate, was and around corners, so it was fabri- gramme by three or four days,” said made specially for a retrospective cated in L-shaped components.” Mr Branford. 8 NSC April 2005


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