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NSC 9 July/Aug 16 Trimble has announced the winners of the UK Tekla Awards 2016, which will now be entered into the Tekla Global BIM Awards. The awards focus on projects of all shapes and sizes, which have used Trimble’s Tekla software as part of the process for designing and modelling structures, or where the use of Tekla software has aided collaboration. Severfield won the Commercial Projects Award for the South Bank Tower development in London (pictured), while William Hare won the Sports and Recreation Projects category for its work on the Olympic Stadium roof. A Public Vote category was also won by Severfield for the Ordsall Chord bridgeworks. Trimble Solutions (UK) Managing Director Richard Fletcher said: “It’s no surprise that once again our competition has yielded some brilliant projects. In fact, the entries that were submitted to this year’s awards were so strong that determining the winners of the seven categories was a tough decision to make. “The awards are an ideal way for our customers to raise their company profile and attract potential new clients, as well as impress existing clients. They showcase and reward the hard work and innovation that goes into using software to solve engineering challenges, working collaboratively and delivering better outcomes for all involved.” Tuesday 19 July 2016 Portal Frame Design - Part 1 In this three-part series. Part 1 covers initial sizing and frame stability. One hour webinar free to BCSA and SCI Members Thursday 15 September 2016 Steel Connection Design This course is for designers and technicians wanting practical tuition in steel connection design. Glasgow. Tuersday 20 September 2016 Portal Frame Design - Part 2 The second presentation in this three-part series covers member verification to BS EN 1993-1-1. One hour webinar free to BCSA and SCI Members Wednesday-Thursday 5-6 October 2016 Essential Steelwork Design -2 days This course introduces the concepts and principles of steel building design to EC3. Leeds. Wednesday 9 November 2016 SCI Annual Event 3D Printing - the future of design and manufacture. London. Diary For SCI events contact Jane Burrell, tel: 01344 636500 email: education@steel-sci.com News Eurocodes review launched In response to the recent EU Referendum, BSI has been quick to confirm that it is business as usual in terms of the UK’s continued participation in the European Standardization System as a full member of the European Standards making body (CEN). As part of this process, BSI has launched a ‘systematic review’ of parts of Eurocode 3. The five parts to be reviewed are: • EN 1993-1-4: 2006 Eurocode 3. Design of steel structures. General rules. Supplementary rules for stainless steels • EN 1993-1-9: 2005 (AC: 2005 + AC: 2009) Eurocode 3. Design of steel structures. Fatigue • EN 1993-1-10: 2005 (AC: 2005 + AC: 2009) Eurocode 3. Design of steel structures. Material toughness and through-thickness properties • EN 1993-1-11: 2006 (AC: 2009) Eurocode 3. Design of steel structures. Design of structures with tension components • EN 1993-2: 2006 (AC: 2009) Eurocode 3. Design of steel structures. Steel bridges The industry is invited to comment on the above standards and, in particular, to respond to the following questions: 1. Do any clauses require editorial or technical correction? 2. Which clauses would benefit from improvements in clarity? 3. Where should the scope of the EN be extended? 4. Where could the EN be shortened? 5. Are there any clauses whose application leads to uneconomic construction? 6. Are there any clauses whose application necessitates excessive design effort? This is an opportunity for the UK to influence the future direction of Eurocodes, and both BCSA and SCI are encouraging UK practitioners to participate in the review. Your comments should be compiled into a template and submitted by 7 October 2016. Contact BSI Helen.Gray@bsigroup.com to receive the template. Steel projects come to the fore at Tekla Awards Four hundred tonnes of curved heavy steel sections have been supplied by Barnshaw Section Benders for the construction of the Mersey Gateway Bridge. The steelwork is being used to form cofferdams that create a safe working environment for the construction of the bridge’s three main pylons. The work to create the cofferdams involved driving steel sheet piles into the riverbed to form an outer circle with a diameter of 40m and a second inner circle with a 20m diameter. The steel piles needed to have some reinforcement fitted so that they can cope with the pressure. This came in the form of huge steel sections that have to be strong enough to support the piles and curved to match the radius of the inner circle. The steel sections measure up to 356mm x 406mm, weigh 467kg/m and are formed to a radius of 9.7m so as to fit on the inside of the steel pile structure. Barnshaws Commercial Director Greg North said: “We often work on large structural steel sections, bending them to add strength to a structure, improve the aesthetic qualities of a project, or, in this case to fit a precise curved profile. “In all, we have formed nearly 400t of this heavy duty steel section to the exact requirements of the client. They will provide the strength necessary to hold the shape of the cofferdams while the foundations of this new river crossing are constructed.” The cable-stayed bridge will have a total length of 1,000m spanning the river Mersey and the Manchester Ship Canal to provide three lanes in each direction, linking the Central Expressway in Runcorn with the main routes to the M62 and towards Liverpool. Curved beams raise Mersey bridge pylons


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