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BCSA says UK steel is still world leader Structural steel remains the material of choice for construction and looks set for further increases in demand over the coming year following growth of 8% in 2015, British Constructional Steelwork Association President Wendy Coney (pictured) told the Association’s National Dinner. Ms Coney said despite the ‘steel in crisis’ headlines that at times dominated the media and could have undermined confidence in steel, supply of structural steel was unaffected by problems that beset manufacturers in the face of overproduction of steel in China. She said: “Steelwork contractor members continued to source their steel from high quality domestic and imported sources, supported by the UK’s domestic steel producer and a strong distribution and stockholding sector. This enabled them to meet demand for a full range of projects and clients.” The UK’s structural steel industry remained the world’s leader and further growth in demand was expected in 2016. Ms Coney said the steel sector has adapted easily to the introduction of new steel procurement guidelines from the government and has been working with government to ensure that the changes support the domestic supply of rolled steel, while at the same time ensuring the new rules do not have unintended consequences along the supply chain. Also during the year, the structural steelwork supply chain played a key role in support of the introduction of Building Information Modelling (BIM), which is now mandatory for government construction projects. The sector’s long-term familiarity with 3D modelling helped a smooth transition to the new BIM regime, as did the training programmes run by BCSA. The BCSA launched a BIM Charter in April that enables steelwork contractors to demonstrate compliance with the government’s BIM requirements. Highly regarded engineer awarded Fellowship at National Dinner Known as the Switch House, the new Tate Modern extension, which increases the museum’s size by 60%, has opened to the public. The pyramid-shaped 10-storey structure accommodates a host of new galleries and exhibition space as well as incorporating a panoramic public viewing terrace on its uppermost level. The structure consists of concrete and steel-framed elements with approximately 1,000t of structural steelwork erected for the project by Severfield. Beginning at ground floor level, Severfield’s steelwork partially fills the project’s footprint as it extends upwards to the fifth floor level where it is overlapped and supports the upper 6 NSC July/Aug 16 The well-known and highly regarded structural engineer Roger Pope, who has been a specialist technical consultant to the BCSA and Tata Steel for many years, was made a Fellow of the BCSA at the National Dinner. Dr Pope started his career in 1964 with an industrial scholarship to attend Oxford University from the Steel Company of Wales, later part of British Steel Corporation. He worked for Redpath Dorman Long and later became managing director of a structural steelwork company before becoming an independent consulting engineer. He has chaired a number of UK and European parts of the concrete frame. A jacking system was connected to the steelwork during much of the construction programme to help redistribute the loads from the upper levels of the structure. The extension is linked to the existing Tate Modern building via two footbridges and an underground route. Clad with distinctive brickwork, the new building fits seamlessly into its surroundings. Jacques Herzog of project architect Herzog & de Meuron, who also worked on the original conversion of Bankside power station into the Tate Modern museum in 2000, said: “Our aim was to create a building conglomerate which appears as one thing, not as a phase one and a phase two.” standards committees and still convenes the European committee responsible for the “Execution of Steel Structures’. He was instrumental in developing the National Structural Steelwork Specification and the Register of Qualified Steelwork Contractors Scheme for Bridgeworks, and is still active as a bridges assessor for the BCSA. BCSA President Wendy Coney said: “I think we would all agree that Roger’s contribution to the constructional steelwork industry has been significant in moving both the codes and standards and the way the industry works forward. This is why I’m delighted to make Roger a Fellow of BCSA.” News Roger Pope receives his Fellowship from Wendy Coney Ten-storey Tate Modern extension opens


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